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Solid recovery continues: German GDP growth at 1.5% in 2015 – ING

Discussion in 'Fundamental Analysis' started by FXStreet_Team, Jan 14, 2016.

  1. FXStreet_Team

    FXStreet_Team Well-Known Member Trader

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    FXStreet (Delhi) – Carsten Brzeski, Research Analyst at ING, notes that the German GDP increased by 1.5% in 2015 (in calendar-adjusted terms), from 1.6% in 2014 and without working day adjustments, German GDP increased by 1.7%, from 1.6%.

    Key Quotes

    “In our view, this outcome suggests that the German economy has probably grown by some 0.4% QoQ in the fourth quarter. However, as no hard data for December has been available so far and the statistical office normal uses extrapolations and historical patterns for its fourth quarter estimates, some downward revisions cannot be excluded.

    Moreover, the statistical office also released a first estimate of Germany’s 2015 fiscal balance, providing more arguments for the critics of too weak German public investment. For the first time since 1961, the German government recorded a fiscal surplus in two consecutive years. According to the statistical office, the fiscal surplus came in at 0.5% of GDP in 2015, from 0.6% GDP in 2014. German austerity fetishists will love it.

    Returning to GDP data, today’s numbers almost close the economic year 2015 for Germany. It was yet another year in which the German economy defied earlier swan songs and, despite many headwinds like the Greek crisis, the slowdown in emerging markets and China and increased geopolitical uncertainties, continued the recovery.

    All in all, the German economy has once again defied many external headwinds and performed another solid growth year in 2015. However, there are at least two caveats to today’s positive data: firstly, after several years of stellar performances (at least vis-à-vis the rest of the Eurozone), the German economy has returned to normality, hardly outperforming the Eurozone any longer. And secondly, without any new structural reforms and investments it is hard to see any sharp acceleration of the economy any time soon. This might be as good as it gets. Therefore, any celebrations and self-adulations should remain extremely modest.”
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